Spanish Wine Scholar SWS by WSG®

ESTE CURSO SOLO SE OFRECE EN INGLÉS

The Spanish Wine Scholar program is the most advanced and comprehensive certification course on the wines of Spain.

The syllabus takes a regional approach and discusses all Spanish wine appellations and the factors that shape their identities. It provides committed students of wine with an unparalleled set of study tools that are designed to maximize learning and boost knowledge retention.

The program was created by Spanish wine specialist Rick Fisher, Spanish Wine Scholar™ Education Director.

Wines from Spain (ICEX - Spain's Trade & Investment Government Agency) has endorsed the program in recognition of its exceptional level of depth, accuracy, detail, and academic rigor.

Students will receive a complete set of study materials, including the SWS Study Manual, SWS Online Study Program, Certified Educator in all live classes, Detailed spanish wine maps, Professional instructor support, wine tasting recommendations of samples from the most important regions...

The course will be delivered in theory webinars, including all the chapters below and an extra review session. There is also an in-class examination on the location and date scheluded. 

The Spanish Wine Scholar™ course is composed of 10 chapters and an exam:

  • Chapter One - Fundamentals

In order for Spanish Wine Scholar candidates to study the wine regions of Spain from a position of strength, Chapter One covers Spanish wine history, wine laws, geography, climate, grape varieties, viticulture and winemaking in depth. It merits reading, even by advanced students of wine, as much has changed, especially with regard to wine law and the new research on grape vine origins.

  • Chapter Two - Green Spain

Spain is normally associated with the production of red wine, but the four regions comprising Green Spain—Galicia, Cantabria, Asturias, and País Vasco—craft some of Spain’s most interesting and unique whites. Local grapes such as Albariño, Godello, Treixadura, and Hondarribi Zuri stand in the spotlight, with the exciting red variety, Mencía, moving ever closer to center stage. This dynamic region redefines the preconceptions of what Spain has to offer the global wine market.

  • Chapter Three - The Duero River Valley

The region of Castilla y León occupies one-fifth of mainland Spain and is home to some of the country’s top wine growing areas such as Ribera del Duero, Rueda and Toro. This is a high-elevation, high-quality production area that experiences extreme seasonal temperature variations. In fact, an old Castilian saying states that the year is comprised of nine months of winter and three months of hell. Yet Tempranillo thrives within this hostile climate—and it produces some of Spain’s most esteemed reds.

  • Chapter Four - La Rioja

Rioja’s wine culture represents a composite of tradition and modernity. Rioja was one of Spain’s first demarcated wine regions yet it continues to reinvent itself. It has set itself apart as one of the world’s greatest wine-producing areas and has maintained that allure for centuries. It is largely responsible for the growth of Spain’s wine reputation around the wine world; it is also the country’s most recognizable wine region by consumers around the globe. Find out why!

  • Chapter Five - The Ebro River Valley

The Ebro River Valley is the birthplace of Garnacha. Wine growing areas such as Navarra, Cariñena, Campo de Borja, and Calatayud are garnering international fame for what is done with this grape. The pure versatility of Garnacha has everyone talking. From rosés to old vine reds, from single varietal to blend, Garnacha has elevated itself from workhorse to thoroughbred. And the world is watching. The Ebro River Valley has also distinguished itself for its many Vinos de Pagos or single vineyard wines. This area is a hotspot for both tradition and trends.

  • Chapter Six - Cataluña

Cataluña is home to cava, Spain’s traditional method sparkling wine. Utilizing local Macabeo, Xarel.lo, and Parellada grapes, Cataluña has put a very Spanish accent on this classic winemaking process. Did you know that the prototype of the gyropalette was developed here! The cooperative concept was also given a brand-new image here! Dubbed “wine cathedrals” many are stunning examples of modernist architecture. In Cataluña, wine has always been elevated to art.

  • Chapter Seven - The Central Mediterranean Coast

The Central Mediterranean Coast, occupying nearly half of Spain’s Mediterranean coast, is not only home to Spain’s national dish, paella, but to two underrated, local grapes quietly taking the world by storm—Monastrell and Bobal. Monastrell has been globe-trotting under the radar for a long time. Fondillón, a dessert wine crafted from this grape, is believed to have been the first wine to join Magellan as he circumnavigated the globe! Explore the legacy that is the Central Mediterranean Coast.

  • Chapter Eight - The Meseta

Castilla-La Mancha is the largest wine-producing region in the world! There are approximately 1,100,000 acres/450,000 hectares under vine which represents nearly one-half of Spain’s total vineyard area! Once known for bulk wine, this area is now home to more than half of Spain’s Vinos de Pago or single estate bottlings. These wines are creative and fresh expressions of an ancient land; they represent a vinous frontier that lies right beneath the feet.

  • Chapter Nine - Andalucía

The dazzlingly white limestone-rich soils of Andalucía have been given voice by the Palomino grape. The combination of sea and heat and sun have taken wine and elevated it into something that reflects the passage of time—in barrel under a film of surface yeast or in barrels via a complex fractionalized blending process known as the “solera.” These fortified wines bear the salty tang of their birthplace, the heat of their climate and the soul of a winemaking process that honors wine with a hauntingly beautiful patina of age. Discover sherry.

  • Chapter Ten - The Islands

The vines compete with the tourists as the consummate sun-worshipers of the Balearic and Canary Islands. Sunburn and wind burn are serious problems for human and grapevine alike! The islanders have developed some unique viticultural practices to block the westerlies, collect rainfall and trellis the vine. And the grapes they grow—Prensal, Listan Blanco, Callet, Manto Negro, and Listan Negro—are equally singular. Just as the islands themselves represent but a small fraction of the landmass below the waves, wine production is distinguished not by its volume but by its sizable sweep of character.

Exam

Candidates who follow this in-depth curriculum on the wines of Spain and pass the exam, earn the Spanish Wine Scholar™ (SWS) post-nominal which may be incorporated into a professional signature (e.g. John Smith, SWS).

The exam takes on hour to complete and it is given in multiple-choice format. There are 100 questions covering all of the wine regions of Spain. Candidates need a passing score of 75% to receive the credential.

 

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  •   Madrid

    10 / 01 / 2022
  •   Santa Cruz de Tenerife

    10 / 01 / 2022
  •   Palma de Mallorca

    10 / 01 / 2022